Entry requirements

There are no formal entry requirements to study this qualification.

Please note that whilst it is possible to study both Stage 1 modules at the same time, students who complete W101 before W102 acquire the legal knowledge, understanding of legal terminology and legal study skills needed for successful study of W102.  If you choose to study the modules together, you may therefore find studying W102 to be more challenging initially. Studying the two modules together is the equivalent of full-time study and you'll need to be able to study for up to 35 hours each week. Also there may be some occasions when the face to face tutorials on W101 and W102 conflict by being on the same date.

How much time do I need?

  • Most of our students study part time, completing 60 credits a year.
  • This will usually mean studying for 16–18 hours a week.
In this section:
How much will it cost?
Ways to pay for your qualification and other support

How much will it cost in England?

We believe cost shouldn’t be a barrier to achieving your potential. That’s why we work hard to keep the cost of study as low as possible and have a wide range of flexible ways to pay to help spread, or even reduce, the cost.

  • Fees are paid on a module-by-module basis – you won't have to pay for the whole of your qualification up front.
  • A qualification comprises a series of modules, each with an individual fee. Added together, they give you the total cost.
  • If, like most OU students, you study part time at a rate of 60 credits a year, you'll take six years to complete an honours degree.
  • Our current fee for 60 credits is £3,096*.
  • Our current fee for 120 credits – which is equivalent to a year's full-time study – is £6,192*.
  • At current prices, the total cost of your qualification would be £18,576*.
  • .

*The fee information provided here is valid for modules starting before 31 July 2021. Fees normally increase annually in line with inflation and the University's strategic approach to fees.


Skills for career development

This degree course will give you the chance to develop yourself beyond the boundaries of your normal work environment. You'll gain skills and knowledge that you can readily put into practice on a daily basis in a wide range of professional contexts. The specialist legal and transferable skills that you'll develop includes: 

  • an in-depth knowledge of the foundation subjects of law and of the legal system of England and Wales
  • an ability to apply legal principles to resolve issues
  • an ability to present and make a reasoned choice between different opinions and solutions
  • an ability to read and discuss complex and technical legal materials
  • competence in the use of basic IT, databases and websites
  • thinking critically about your own learning and performance and taking steps to improve them.

Career relevance

Studying law opens up many career options, whether in law or law-related fields, including solicitor, barrister, legal executive and paralegal. Solicitors and barristers usually work in private practice, in central or local government, commerce, industry, the armed forces or in professional bodies.

Solicitors and barristers in England and Wales need to complete three stages of training:

  • Academic – a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD)
  • Vocational – a Legal Practice Course (LPC) for solicitors. Alternatively the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) for barristers. 
  • Professional – a training contract for solicitors or ‘pupillage’ for barristers. 

Other relevant jobs include Citizens Advice Bureau caseworker, Crown Prosecution Service caseworker, magistrates’ court legal adviser, court reporter or administrator, licensed conveyancer, patent attorney, trademark agent, teacher, or lecturer in law.

Further employability and careers information is available on The Open University Law School website

Accreditation

The Bachelor of Laws (Honours) is recognised by The Solicitors Regulation Authority and The Bar Standards Board as a ‘Qualifying Law Degree’, and by the Council of Legal Education (Northern Ireland).

Other careers

The knowledge and skills you will gain from studying this degree are recognised and highly respected by employers outside the legal profession. Roles in finance, human resources, local government or general management all benefit from a legal background and from the discipline of studying law.

Many graduate-level jobs are open to graduates of any subject area, particularly in business, finance, management consultancy and the public sector. Some careers may require further study, training and/or work experience beyond your degree.

Exploring your options

Once you register with us (and for up to three years after you finish your studies), you’ll have full access to our careers service for a wide range of information and advice. This includes online forums, website, interview simulation, vacancy service as well as the option to email or speak to a careers adviser. Some areas of the careers service website are available for you to see now, including help with looking for and applying for jobs. You can also read more general information about how OU study enhances your career.

In the meantime if you want to do some research around this qualification and where it might take you, we’ve put together a list of relevant job titles as a starting point. Some careers may require further study, training and/or work experience.

  • solicitor
  • barrister
  • barrister's clerk
  • legal executive
  • paralegal
  • judge
  • usher
  • researcher
  • legal cashier
  • legal secretary
  • civil servant
  • company secretary
  • teacher
  • patent attorney
  • tax adviser.

Register for this course

Start dates
Credit transfer: apply by 13/08/2020
Credit transfer: apply by 17/12/2020

Download a prospectus

Our prospectuses are your essential guide to studying with us, covering courses, fees and funding, career prospects and more.

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